Welcome to the K12 section of the Radiocarbon WEBinfo site.

The aim here is to provide clear, understandable information relating to radiocarbon dating for the benefit of K12 students, as well as lay people who are not requiring detailed information about the method of radiocarbon dating itself.

They used pottery and other materials in sites to date 'relatively'.

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We know that it is older than Christendom, but whether by a couple of years or a couple of centuries, or even by more than a millenium, we can do no more than guess." [Rasmus Nyerup, (Danish antiquarian), 1802 (in Trigger, 19)].

The person who wrote these words lived in the 1800s, many years before archaeologists could accurately date materials from archaeological sites using scientific methods.

Eventually, a particle is emitted from the carbon 14 atom, and carbon 14 disappears.

Most of the carbon on Earth exists in a slightly different atomic form, although it is chemically speaking, identical to all carbon.

After the war he became very interested in peaceful applications of atomic science.

He and two students first measured the "half-life" of radiocarbon.

Carbon follows this pathway through the food chain on Earth so that all living things are using carbon, building their bodies until they die.

A tiny part of the carbon on the Earth is called Carbon-14 (C14), or radiocarbon.

The relative dating method worked very well, but only in sites which were had a connection to the relative scale. When radiocarbon dating was developed, it revolutionised archaeology, because it enabled them to more confidently date the past, and to build a more accurate picture of the human past.

The archaeologist Colin Renfrew (1973) called it the development of this dating method 'the radiocarbon revolution' in describing its great impact upon the human sciences.

The radiocarbon method was developed by a team of scientists led by the late Professor Willard F.