Most likely, the answer is yes, as the tropical and subtropical regions, to which the Caribbean region belongs, have undergone minimal climatic variations even amid the tumult of the ice ages and interglacials that have taken place over the Pleistocene epoch.

radiometric dating vs carbon 14-25

In Hancock’s own words: “What one would not expect to find in water anywhere near as deep as 700 meters would be a sunken city - unless it had been submerged by some colossal tectonic event rather than by rising sea levels.” However, the hypothesis that the city was originally built at a higher altitude and subsequently sunk to its present depth through tectonic activity has not stood up to the scrutiny of the experts.

Grenville Draper of Florida International University considers it highly unlikely that such an event could have occurred: “Nothing of this magnitude has been reported, even from the Mediterranean…” Supposing Draper’s remarks rejecting the likelihood of the city having submerged are reliable, we are compelled to accept that the city was built at more or less the same depth that the city is located now.

Indeed, if the West Indies were like the Central American isthmus as it is today, unbroken and uniformly above sea level, the Caribbean Basin would have effectively become what geologists refer to as an endorheic basin, a basin that is isolated from the world ocean.

However, the isolation of the Caribbean Basin from the larger world ocean, though necessary, is not in and of itself, sufficient for it to have been dry.

First, the West Indies archipelago, instead of being a string of islands (lying above sea level) separated by numerous waterways (lying below sea level), as it is now, would have had to be a strip of land lying above sea level throughout its entire length.

In other words, the Yucatan Peninsula must have been connected to Cuba via a land bridge, instead of being separated by a strait, and Cuba with Haiti, and Haiti with Puerto Rico, and so on, until finally, the island of Grenada must have been connected to the South American mainland with a land bridge, instead of being separated from it by a strait.In order for the Caribbean to have been dry, there is another necessary condition that must have been met; namely, there must have been an excess of evaporation over precipitation over the basin's watershed.Today, there is indeed an excess of evaporation over precipitation over the Caribbean region, but was this true throughout the entire time behaviorally modern humans have existed, which has witnessed a great variety of climatic conditions?Dividing Europe and Africa, the Mediterranean Sea is an enormous sea - over 2,500,000 km2 (965,255 square miles) that has, at least within the timeline of anatomically modern man, always existed.For millennia, ships of successive great nations and empires sailed the Mediterranean; the Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians, and Romans among them.Submerged over 700 meters (2300 feet) underwater, the Cuban city discovered by Paulina Zelitsky and Paul Weinzweig during a joint Cuban-Canadian expedition is the singular exception.