"And even they admit that a lot of it is kind of bogus."Rachel Greenwald, an author and dating coach, thinks it's because most college "relationships" now occur within the context of a brief sexual encounter, or "hookup," as the youth say.

And in so far as universities are laboratories of successful adulthood, coursework about relationships "are Gottlieb said that the emphasis on college campuses these days seems to be on independence, or the idea that students shouldn't settle down too soon.

But she said she also sees young-adult psychotherapy clients who feel lonely in spite of their career success.

including recognizing when this can be happening," as well as how to communicate effectively, how to recognize when said love is "toxic," and how to know when it's time to break up.

Sorely missing from this list: Intro to Back-rubs, Peaceable Joint IKEA Expedit Assembly, Advanced Topics in Netflix Negotiation.

Which makes it hard when, in a relationship, your reality is that you will go to the farmer's market and make a healthy salad together, and your partner's reality is Starcraft.

Gottlieb also thinks college kids don't know how to interact face-to-face anymore. The new guys seemed so cute, and your love life seemed so full of possibilities.But soon you knew all their names, who was cool, and who was weird.(Always with the texting.) She points out that one new Boston College class assigns students to go out on dates—the coursework includes a discussion of "what words to say" when you'd like to ask someone out.Similarly, the University of Illinois now holds workshops on topics like "College Dating: Uncovering the Dating Scene." Duke University offers a counseling series on "How to Be in Love." Students will learn "how to fall in love …If college students were better-equipped to start and maintain relationships, her thinking goes, they would feel more fulfilled in adulthood.