The trio reached the

The trio reached the $1 million-per-episode mark (at 24 episodes per season) in their last three-year pact with Warner Bros. That deal came in 2014, after a brief public tussle that emerged as production began that summer.

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The trio reached the $1 million-per-episode mark (at 24 episodes per season) in their last three-year pact with Warner Bros. That deal came in 2014, after a brief public tussle that emerged as production began that summer.

Two years later, “Big Bang” is still pulling in big audiences for CBS (the season 10 premiere grabbed 21.5 million viewers) and huge dollars in syndication.

million-per-episode mark (at 24 episodes per season) in their last three-year pact with Warner Bros. That deal came in 2014, after a brief public tussle that emerged as production began that summer.

Two years later, “Big Bang” is still pulling in big audiences for CBS (the season 10 premiere grabbed 21.5 million viewers) and huge dollars in syndication.

You could not pay me to marry my ex-boyfriend on television.

Even if it were fake, the act of putting on a wedding gown and walking down an aisle would probably give me hives.

Supporting cast members Simon Helberg and Kunal Nayyar have seen their paychecks climb to around $900,000 per episode this season, the last on the current deal. TV’s current license agreement with CBS calls for the network to cover most of the show’s production costs. TV the biggest financial incentive to produce new episodes, although there are other considerations.

For one, there are the bragging rights of having TV’s top-rated comedy. As much as the network’s rivals covet the ratings of “Big Bang,” it would be a huge financial stretch for a rival net to offer significantly more than $10 million an episode to persuade Warner Bros. The high cost already limits CBS’ upside on the show, which last season fetched about $350,000 per 30-second spot (there are about 16 in each episode).

For another, there’s the studio’s relationship with “Big Bang” co-creator/exec producer Chuck Lorre. Again, CBS realizes other benefits from having “Big Bang” on its air that make it worth the price tag — from serving as a launch pad for other shows to packaging its spots with other programs for maximum leverage with advertisers.

But the license fee can’t get too much higher, or the financials just won’t work.

But even if their wages are stagnant, the math still looks pretty good for America’s favorite geeks.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported that CBS’ current “Big Bang Theory” license agreement calls for the network to cover all production costs plus a premium.

But those lucrative sales to local TV stations and cabler TBS had clauses that capped the buyers’ length of commitment.