But I suspect this has less to do with how fair or equal the white collar workforce is than how much worse the job opportunities are for women in the working class labor pool.One of the things I normally write about is the oil industry.

In an era in which women were getting married young and having kids soon after, there wasn’t much of an expectation for long stays in the workforce.

Goldin attributes the change to the pill, which allowed women to delay marriage and childbirth.

Some of the old discrimination obscured what is essentially a fundamental biological truth, that girls mature socially and intellectually faster than boys.

Even though boys and girls score comparably on raw intelligence tests, when it comes to actual school work, girls fare much better.

Girls are better organized, they’re more likely to be valedictorians. You say that the growing numbers of women in college have a lot to do with the “college wage premium,” the amount people can boost their earnings by going to college, and that this premium is bigger for women than for men.

Claudia Goldin, the Harvard economist, points out that the college wage premium has always been higher for women – even 100 years ago, which is interesting.The interview has been edited for length and clarity. Many more men than women were graduating from college, and there was gender bias both in secondary schooling and in college admissions.Back then, there was this mindset that young women went to college not to prepare for careers, but to get their “MRS.” So the passage of Title IX in 1972 certainly leveled the playing field.The main idea is that women have been attending college at much higher rates than men since the 1980s, in the U. The dating pool for college-educated people in their 30s now has five women for every four men.For people in their 20s, it's four women for every three men. In Manhattan, there are 38 percent more female college grads under the age of 25 than college-grad men, according to Birger's data. C., 86 percent in Miami, 49 percent in Washington and 37 percent in Los Angeles. that more men than women graduated from college was 1981.If you spend any time in North Dakota, which is the big booming oil state these days, you have kids right out of high school, and 98% are men, earning 50, 60, 70 thousand dollars a year as roughnecks.