They are cute little planes that look sorta neat on a mantle, or on top of your TV, which is probably a better place for them than in your shop due to their value.Every serious collector of old tools wants one of these little monkeys, which makes the cost of owning one rather steep.

So, if you have a plane that's one-half inch shorter or longer than what's mentioned here, don't go thinking that you have some ultra-rare version of the tool.

You don't (except in the case of the #2One other thing - you'll note that I sometimes refer to the cutter as the iron and vice versa.

There are far too many of them out there to be considered salesman's samples or novelties as some people believe them to be.

As proof that they were used, they do suffer damage, primarily about their mouth.

I've always used the term 'iron' to represent the chunk of metal you sharpen to make the plane a plane.

Stanley, in their reams of propaganda, referred to it as a 'cutter'.

I wish I bought every last one I saw a dozen years ago - I'd be wintering in Palm Beach, if I had.

The plane has been reproduced and can fool the novice very easily.

It never has a number cast on it, nor was it ever provided a lateral adjustment lever.