Columbia Heights — Columbia Heights includes the city's largest shopping mall as well as plenty of budget dining and drinking options. or the District, and it is rare to hear it called anything else.Along with the adjacent neighborhood of Mount Pleasant, it is home to most of the city's Salvadoran population and its signature comfort food, the pupusa. Locals usually use the name Washington to refer to the national government and the political world, rather than the city itself. C., and the official name, District of Columbia, are rarely used by non-bureaucrats unless the speaker is trying to clearly distinguish the city from Washington State. C., is a city borne of politics, by politics, and for politics.C.'s trendiest and most diverse neighborhoods and the places to go for live music, nightlife, and loads of restaurants, Howard University, boutique shopping, beautiful embassies, Little Ethiopia, U Street, and lots of nice hotels.

The federal government finally moved to the new capital in 1800, which by then had been named Washington, in honor of its founder (though Washington still preferred to call it the "Federal City").

During the War of 1812, British forces burned the Capitol Building, Treasury, and White House, although they were all rebuilt shortly thereafter.

Shaw — the more laid back of the three North Central neighborhoods, which historically has been the center of African-American cultural life in the city, has nightlife along U St catering to a slightly older and more sophisticated crowd, incredible food in Little Ethiopia, off-beat shopping, the city's main live music venues, and its most exciting art gallery scene at Logan Circle.

Adams Morgan — Adams Morgan has many bars with live music concentrated on 18th street, several good restaurants and is just a nice neighborhood for a walk.

C.'s high-end shopping; more Embassy Row; American University; and several nice dining strips. C./Brookland, Anacostia)Starting at the Capitol Building and Library of Congress, and fanning out past grandiose Union Station and the historic Capitol Hill neighborhood, to the less often visited neighborhoods by Gallaudet and Catholic University, historic Anacostia, D.

C.'s "Little Vatican" around the National Shrine, the huge National Arboretum, the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, offbeat nightlife in the Atlas District, and a handful of other eccentric neighborhoods to explore.

Issues with financing and a lack of skilled craftsmen slowed the construction of the city.

The commissioners ultimately relied on African slaves lent from nearby plantations to complete construction.

The vistas on the National Mall between the Capitol, Washington Monument, White House, and Lincoln Memorial are famous throughout the world as icons of the world's wealthiest and most powerful nation. Travellers will find the city to be exciting, cosmopolitan, and international. C.'s tourists flock to the National Mall—a two-mile long, beautiful stretch of parkland that holds many of the city's monuments and Smithsonian museums—but the city itself is a vibrant metropolis that often has little to do with monuments, politics, or white, neoclassical buildings. Downtown (The National Mall, East End, West End, Waterfront)The most-visited areas: The National Mall, D.

is the capital of the United States of America and the seat of its three branches of government, as well as the federal district of the U. The city has an unparalleled collection of free, public museums and many of the nation's most treasured monuments and memorials. shed its former reputation as a boring and dangerous city and it now has shopping, dining, and nightlife befitting a world-class metropolis.

C.'s most historic neighborhood, and one of its most trendy, is home to the fabled "Washington Elite," the city's première upmarket dining scene, colonial architecture and cobblestone streets, sports bars, upscale and boutique shopping, bucolic Dumbarton Oaks, and Georgetown University.