It has been assumed that once this occurs, the memory is "fixed" — a permanent, unchanging, representation.

consolidating new memories requires the amygdala and-51

Consolidating new memories requires the amygdala and advice on dating woman with kids

Perhaps our best approach is to see memory as a series of processes, and consolidation as an agreed-upon (and possibly arbitrary) subset of those processes.

and occurs within the first few hours after learning, and systems consolidation, where hippocampus-dependent memories become independent of the hippocampus over a period of weeks to years.

This has been interpreted as evidence for a memory consolidation process.

Some research suggests that the hippocampus may participate only in consolidation processes lasting a few years.

Memories of emotionally arousing events tend to be more vivid and to persist longer than do memories of neutral or trivial events, and are, moreover, more likely to require only a single experience. Memories are subject to change every time they are activated (such activation doesn't have to bring the memory to your conscious awareness).

Whether or not the hippocampus may retain some older memories, the evidence that some memories might be held in the hippocampus for several years, only to move on, as it were, to another region, is another challenge to a simple consolidation theory. But consolidation traditionally (and logically) refers to encoding processes.The entorhinal cortex, on the other hand, gives evidence of temporally graded changes extending up to 20 years, suggesting that it is this region that participates in memory consolidation over decades.The entorhinal cortex is damaged in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.The hippocampus is involved in the recognition of place and the consolidation of contextual memories, and is part of a region called the medial temporal lobe (MTL), that also includes the perirhinal, parahippocampal,and entorhinal cortices.Lesions in the medial temporal lobe typically produce amnesia characterized by the disproportionate loss of recently acquired memories."Consolidation" is a term that is bandied about a lot in recent memory research. Initially, information is thought to be encoded as patterns of neural activity — cells "talking" to each other.